Poster with pictore of a woman painted and a lp with modelling clay

Illustration:
Alexander Horn: from the series Only the Rocks Remain, 2023 / 2024, ink and acrylic on wood/cardboard, 15 x 10 cm
Henrik Jacob: Knetplatte, modelling clay on record, 2023 (Detail)

Image and Sound

9 April – 26 May 2024
Opening: Fri 19 April, 7 pm

Bild und Ton (Image and Sound) is the title of the joint exhibition by Alexander Horn (Mannheim) and Henrik Jacob (Berlin), which will open at Galerie Wolf & Galentz on 19 April 2024. Henrik Jacob’s solo exhibition Blue Balloon was on show at the gallery during the coronavirus crisis in 2019, and Alexander Horn has been involved in several group exhibitions at the gallery.
We would like to invite you to the opening on Friday, 19 April 2024 from 7 pm.

Modelling Clay, Music and AI

Henrik Jacob, who most often creates works in black and white modelling clay, will be showing an interactive installation at Wolf & Galentz consisting of drawings, stickers, clay pictures and clay records. He will use the latter to make the versatile material of modelling clay acoustically tangible and let it resound. The record needle makes its way through a thick layer of modelling clay, changing the material itself and at the same time the sound it produces. Every sound is unique.

A completely new series of modelling clay pictures will be shown whose origin from AI image templates remains clearly visible in the final works. Henrik Jacob has simply adopted the built-in errors of the image generators and integrated them into the pictures. In his plasticine image series Real Estate – House for Sale (2024), for example, detached houses from artificially generated property adverts are offered for sale to viewers with all their shortcomings: those who don’t mind half windows, floating bushes and external staircases leading to nowhere can buy a plasticine property for a low price.

Only the Rocks Remain and The Last One at the Party

Alexander Horn’s paintings are just about the size of a postcard – the edges are not cleanly cut, the panels are not the same size; some are portrait, some landscape formats. Hung in a row, they form a swelling and receding line. Both series, Only the Rocks Remain and The Last One at the Party, show full-length portrait heads, one in dark near-monochrome, the other in nuances between white and black. Strangely attractive and at the same time absent, introverted, the sitters look directly out of the picture or are turned into profile. The small formats force the viewer to look up close, the intensity of the encounter is inescapable. It remains unclear who these people are, but it seems as if they are looking into our innermost being. Beyond words, Alexander Horn tells of the indescribable – of being human and what remains when the party is over.
Kim Behm